Neurons and axon in cell differentiation

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Cellular differentiation

Cellular differentiation
Neurons of a mouse hippocampus at 2 days of differentiation in culture. A long axon (middle right) branches out from the neuron, top-left, forming a structure called a branch point. This structure will give rise to future axonal branches. A few short neurites can be seen extending from the middle neuron, as well as a long axon (bottom left) which branches out and forms a most peculiar structure called an axonal growth cone. This image shows the sub-cellular location of the various components of the neuronal cytoskeleton: the microtubules in green, marked with an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody, extend all the way along the cell and invade the entire surface of the axonal growth cone and branch point. The actin cytoskeleton in red, marked with Phalloidin, lies at the end of the neurites, axonal growth cone and branch point. The protein binding to the STOP microtubules in blue is very enriched all the way along the axon, in the axonal growth cone and branch point.

 

Cellular differentiation

Cellular differentiation
Neurons of a mouse hippocampus at 2 days of differentiation in culture. A few short neurites extend out of the cell body (top right) as well as a long axon (bottom left) which branches out. This image shows the sub-cellular location of the various components of the neuronal cytoskeleton: the microtubules in green, marked with an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody, extend all the way along the surface of the cell. The actin cytoskeleton in red, marked with Phalloidin, lies at the end of the neurites and axon, in a most peculiar structure called a growth cone. The protein binding to the STOP microtubules in blue is very enriched in the axon.

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